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Waky Week in Music History


Today's Birthdays, 3/27…
  • Genesis keyboardist Tony Banks is 65.
  • INXS keyboardist Andy Farriss is 56.
  • Santana sax player Jules Broussard is 78.
  • Rock and Roll Hall of Famer Mo Ostin is 88.  He was a key figure in the careers of such acts as Fleetwood Mac, the Grateful Dead, James Taylor, and Neil Young.


Today in History

In 1952

  • Sun Records in Memphis began issuing records.


In 1957

  • A 12-year-old Brenda Lee made her debut on the country music chart with "One Step at a Time."


In 1961

  • The Shirelles' "Dedicated to the One I Love" peaked at number three on the pop singles chart.
  • The Everly Brothers' "Walk Right Back" peaked at number seven on the pop singles chart.
  • Del Shannon's "Runaway" and Ray Charles' "One Mint Julep" broke into the Top 40.


In 1964

  • The Beatles released the single "Why."


In 1965

  • The Yardbirds replaced lead guitarist Eric Clapton with Jeff Beck, who'd been recommended by the group's first choice, Jimmy Page.
  • The Supremes' "Stop! In the Name of Love" hit number one on the pop singles chart.
  • Herman's Hermits' "Can You Hear My Heartbeat" peaked at number two on the pop singles chart.
  • The Moody Blues' "Go Now," The Mindbenders' "Game of Love," and Freddie and the Dreamers' "I'm Telling You Now" broke into the Top 40.
  • The Who released the single "I Can't Explain."


In 1967

  • The Rolling Stones were pelted with bottles, chairs, and even fireworks during a concert in Sweden.  Police used dogs to clear the unruly crowd.
  • The Young Rascals recorded the song "Groovin'."


In 1968

  • Tom Jones made a guest appearance on "The Jonathan Winters Show."
  • The Beatles' "Lady Madonna" hit number one on the UK Record Retailer chart.


In 1970

  • Ringo Starr released the album "Sentimental Journey" in the UK.


In 1971

  • Brewer & Shipley's "One Toke Over The Line" was banned by a New York radio station because programers believed the song contained a drug reference.
  • Ike & Tina Turner's "Proud Mary" peaked at number four on the pop singles chart.
  • The Partridge Family's "Doesn't Somebody Want To Be Wanted" peaked at number six on the pop singles chart.
  • George Harrison's "What Is Life" peaked at number ten on the pop singles chart.
  • Three Dog Night's "Joy To The World" broke into the Top 40.


In 1972

  • Grand Funk Railroad fired manager Terry Knight, which sparked a round of lawsuits.


In 1973

  • "Rolling Stone" magazine reported that Carlos Santana had changed his name to Devadip.
  • Grateful Dead frontman Jerry Garcia was arrested after police in New Jersey, who pulled him over on the turnpike for speeding, found drugs and other illegal substances in his car.


In 1976

  • Gary Wright's "Dream Weaver" peaked at number two on the pop singles chart.


In 1977

  • Jimmy Buffett released the album "Changes in Latitudes, Changes in Attitudes."


In 1978

  • The Beatles' parody film "The Rutles: All You Need Is Cash" made its debut on British TV.


In 1981

  • New U.S. releases included AC/DC's album "Dirty Deeds Done Dirt Cheap" and Beach Boy Carl Wilson's self-titled solo debut, while John Lennon's single "Watching the Wheels" was released in the UK.


In 1982

  • The Faces' Ronnie Lane was admitted to the hospital for treatment for multiple sclerosis.


In 1986

  • Sammy Hagar played his first show as Van Halen's new lead singer.


In 1988

  • Tina Turner gave what she was calling her last live concert in Osaka, Japan.  Mick Jagger made a guest appearance at the show, singing "Honky Tonk Women" with her.


In 1992

  • Bruce Springsteen released the album "Human Touch."


In 1995

  • Elton John and Tim Rice won the Oscar for Best Original Song for "Can You Feel The Love Tonight" from "The Lion King."


In 1998

  • Alice Cooper broke ground for his rock 'n' jock themed restaurant and bar, Alice Cooperstown, in Phoenix, Arizona.


In 1999
  • The Bee Gees played the inaugural concert at Sydney, Australia's new Olympic Stadium.  It was the last show of their "One Night Only" tour.


In 2003

  • The Rolling Stones announced that the SARS outbreak in Asia was forcing the group to cancel the group's first-ever concerts in Hong Kong.
  • John Lennon's childhood home at 251 Menlove Avenue in Liverpool, England, was made accessible to the public.  Yoko Ono was there for the opening event.


In 2006

  • Elvis Presley's Graceland mansion in Memphis, Tennessee was named a National Historic Landmark.
  • Kansas and the band's singer-violinist Robby Steinhardt parted ways.  A post on singer-keyboardist Steve Walsh's website indicated it wasn't a very amicable split.


In 2007

  • Warren Zevon's "Envoy" was released for the first time on CD.  That album, along with the reissued "Excitable Boy" and "Stand in the Fire," included never before released bonus tracks.

In 2008
  • The Allman Brothers Band announced that they were scrapping their annual engagement at New York's Beacon Theater because singer-keyboardist Gregg Allman needed more time to recover after undergoing successful treatments for Hepatitis C.
  • Joan Baez took part in a celebration marking her 50th anniversary as a performer at the Cambridge, Massachusetts venue Club Passim, during which she received a Lifetime Achievement Award.
  • The People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals offered to pay the roughly 19-thousand-dollars the Aretha Franklin reportedly owed in back taxes if she would agree to stop wearing fur and donate the furs she has to the organization.
  • The Rolling Stones were welcome to return to Blackpool, England, as the city council lifted a ban set in place in 1964 after a riot broke out at one of the group's shows.

In 2010
  • Elton John performed at the 15th Dubai World Cup, a thoroughbred horse racing competition in the United Arab Emirates.

In 2011
  • Neil Young was named Artist of the Year at the 2011 Juno Awards.  It was one of three honors for Young, who also took the Adult Alternative prize for the album "Le Noise" and received the Allan Waters Humanitarian Award.  Rush was also a winner, getting the nod for Best Music DVD of the Year for "Rush: Beyond The Lighted Stage."

In 2013
  • Gordon Stoker, a member of Elvis Presley's famed backing group The Jordanaires, died at a hospice in Nashville.  He was 88.  Gordon spent more than 60 years with The Jordanaires, and sang on some of Elvis' biggest hits including "Don't Be Cruel," "Are You Lonesome Tonight," and "It's Now or Never."

 

Today's Birthdays, 3/26…
  • Aerosmith frontman Steven Tyler is 67
  • Former Boston bassist Fran Sheehan is 66.
  • ELO keyboardist Richard Tandy is 67.
  • Diana Ross is 71.
  • Vicki Lawrence is 66.  While she's better known as an actress, she topped the pop chart in 1973 with the hit "The Night The Lights Went Out In Georgia."
  • The Five Satins' Fred Parris is 79.  He wrote the group's 1956 hit "In the Still of the Night."


Today in History

In 1955

  • Bill Hayes' "The Ballad of Davy Crockett," topped the U.S. charts.


In 1957

  • Ricky Nelson had his first recording session at Master Records.  He cut "I'm Walkin'," "A Teenager's Romance," and "You're My One And Only Love." 


In 1959

  • The Coasters recorded the single, "Along Came Jones."


In 1961

  • Elvis Presley set a British chart first when he hit number one with three consecutive releases, "It's Now Or Never," "Are You Lonesome Tonight" and "Wooden Heart."


In 1964

  • Chuck Berry recorded "No Particular Place To Go" at Chess Studios in Chicago.
  • The Beatles filmed the final concert scenes for the movie "A Hard Day's Night" at the Scala Theater in London.


In 1966

  • While on a UK tour, Roy Orbison fell off a motorbike while scrambling at Hawkstone Park, Birmingham fracturing his foot.  But he didn't cancel the rest of the trek.  Even though he was on crutches, for the remaining dates he performed sitting on a stool.
  • The Beatles' "Nowhere Man" peaked at number three on the pop singles chart.
  • Simon & Garfunkel's "Homeward Bound" peaked at number five on the pop singles chart.
  • A number of songs broke into the Top 40 chart, including Paul Revere and the Raiders' "Kicks," the Rascals' "Good Lovin'," The Outsiders' "Time Won't Let Me," Johnny Rivers' "Secret Agent Man," and Cher's "Bang Bang (My Baby Shot Me Down)."
  • The Rolling Stones began another European tour.


In 1967

  • The Dave Clark Five made an appearance on "The Ed Sullivan Show." 


In 1969

  • Marvin Gaye's "I Heard It Through The Grapevine" hit number one on the UK pop singles chart.


In 1970

  • Peter Yarrow of Peter, Paul, and Mary was found guilty of, quote, "taking immoral liberties" with a 14-year-old girl, for which he spent three months in jail.  The group had just received a Grammy for Best Recording for Children for their album "Peter, Paul, and Mommy."


  • In 1972

Elvis Presley recorded what turned out to be his last major hit, "Burning Love."

In 1975

  • Ken Russell's movie version of the Who's rock opera, "Tommy," premiered in London.


In 1976

  • Wings guitarist Jimmy McCulloch broke his finger in an accident in Paris.  The injury forced McCartney and the band to delay the start of their North American tour by three weeks.
  • Rolling Stones guitarist Keith Richards and Anita Pallenberg had a son, Tara.


In 1977

  • George Harrison's "Crackerbox Palace" peaked at number 19 on the pop singles chart.


In 1978

  • Journey released the album "Infinity," featuring the hit "Wheel in the Sky."


In 1980

  • Van Halen released the album "Women and Children First."


In 1982

  • Paul McCartney and Stevie Wonder released the single "Ebony & Ivory" in the UK.


In 1983

  • Golden Earring's "Twilight Zone" peaked at number ten on the pop singles chart.
  • Eric Clapton's "I've Got A Rock 'n' Roll Heart" peaked at number 18 on the pop singles chart.


In 1986

  • Kerry McCarver Lewis, the 23-year-old sixth wife of Jerry Lee Lewis, who was then 51, filed for divorce.  The couple later reconciled, but split again in 2003.


In 1990

  • Heart released the album "Brigade."


In 1991

  • Rod Stewart released the album "Vagabond Heart."


In 1998

  • Three Dog Night's Chuck Negron filed a lawsuit against his former band mates, alleging they breached a 1990 settlement agreement and interfered with his career.


In 2000

  • Carly Simon performed "Act Naturally" for a Blockbuster ad that made its debut during the Oscars broadcast.


In 2002

  • The Calcutta chapter of the International Society of Krishna Consciousness announced plans for a memorial garden honoring the late Beatle George Harrison.
  • Drummer Randy Castillo died from cancer.  He had worked with Ozzy Osbourne, Motley Crue, and Lita Ford.  He was 51.


In 2004

  • Van Halen announced that the band was going on tour, and that Sammy Hagar would be the frontman for the trek.
  • Jan & Dean's Jan Berry died after suffering a seizure at his Brentwood, California home.  He was 62.


In 2005

  • The late Foghat guitarist Rod Price was remembered at a memorial service in Wilton, New Hampshire.  The classic rocker had died several days earlier after having a heart attack on a stairway in his New Hampshire home, and suffering massive head trauma in the fall down the stairs.  He was 57.


In 2007

  • Patti LaBelle received a special achievement award at the Gay and Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation's 18th annual GLAAD Media Awards in New York.


In 2009

  • The jury in Phil Spector's second murder trial began their deliberations.
  • Ozzy Osbourne revealed during an appearance on "Jimmy Kimmel Live" that -- at the age of 60 -- he was learning how to drive.
  • Smokey Robinson, Stevie Wonder, Joss Stone, and Ruben Studdard were guest performers on "American Idol."  It was "Motown Week" on the show, and Robinson had served as the guest mentor.


In 2010

  • Anthrax bassist Frank Bello met with kids at a Manhattan school as he donated Fender bass guitars and amps to 15 of the city's public schools through the Little Kids Rock program.


In 2011

  • Styx frontman Tommy Shaw made his debut at Nashville's Grand Ole Opry, performing in support of his solo bluegrass album, "The Great Divide."


In 2013

  • New releases included Depeche Mode's album "Delta Machine."


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Today's Birthdays, 3/25…
  • Aretha Franklin is 73.
  • Elton John is 68.
  • Spandau Ballet's Steve Norman is 55.


Today in History

In 1960

  • Ray Charles recorded "Georgia On My Mind" at Capitol Studios in New York.
  • Roy Orbison recorded "Only the Lonely."


In 1961

  • Elvis Presley made his last concert appearance for eight years with a show on the USS Arizona at Pearl Harbor in Hawaii.  The show was a benefit concert, which raised 62-thousand-dollars for the USS Arizona memorial fund.


In 1965

  • Bob Dylan's "The Times They Are A-Changin'" and Donovan's "Catch the Wind" made their debuts on the UK pop singles chart.  They were the first UK chart entries for each artist.


In 1967

  • The Beatles won two British Ivor Novello Awards.  "Michelle" was acknowledged for being the most broadcast song in 1966, while "Yellow Submarine" was noted for the highest sales of 1966.
  • The Rolling Stones kicked off a tour of Europe with a show in Sweden.
  • Cream arrived in New York to begin its first U.S. tour.
  • The Turtles' "Happy Together" hit number one on the pop singles chart.
  • The Mamas and the Papas' "Dedicated to the One I Love" peaked at number two on the pop singles chart.
  • Herman's Hermits' "There's A Kind of Hush" peaked at number four on the pop singles chart.
  • Mitch Ryder and the Detroit Wheels' "Sock It To Me Baby!" peaked at number six on the pop singles chart.
  • The Buffalo Springfield's "For What It's Worth (Stop, Hey, What's That Sound)" peaked at number seven on the pop singles chart.
  • The Monkees' "A Little Bit Me, A Little Bit You" and Frank and Nancy Sinatra's "Somethin' Stupid" broke into the Top 40.


In 1968

  • The last original episode of the TV series "The Monkees" aired.


In 1969

  • Roy Orbison married his second wife, Barbara, in a ceremony in Nashville.


In 1972

  • America's "A Horse With No Name" hit number one on the pop singles chart.  It was from the group's self-titled album, which was the number one selling LP.
  • Roberta Flack's "The First Time Ever I Saw Your Face" and Aretha Franklin's "Day Dreaming" broke the Top 40.

In 1976

  • Jackson Browne's wife, Phyllis Major, committed suicide.


In 1977

  • Aretha Franklin was the guest host on "The Midnight Special."


In 1978
Atlanta Rhythm Section's "Imaginary Lover" and Jefferson Starship's "Count On Me" broke into the Top 40.
Buddy Holly's album "20 Golden Greats" hit number one on the UK albums chart.  It was the first time Holly topped the album chart in Britain.

In 1979

  • Van Halen released the album album "Van Halen 2."


In 1985

  • Stevie Wonder won the Oscar for Best Original Song for "I Just Called To Say I Love You" from the movie "The Woman in Red."


In 1989

  • Mike and the Mechanics' "The Living Years" hit number one on the pop singles chart.


In 2001

  • Bob Dylan won the Oscar for Best Original Song for "Things Have Changed" from the movie "Wonder Boys."
In 2003
  • Paul McCartney launched his European "Back in the World" tour with a show in Paris.
  • Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers announced that they were postponing their summer European tour in the wake of the U.S. military action in Iraq.Eric Clapton performed at a concert in support of the British charity Teenage Cancer Trust at London's Royal Albert Hall.  Former Dire Straits frontman Mark Knopfler was also supposed to perform at the event, but injuries from a motorcycle accident a few days earlier forced him to cancel his appearance.
  • New releases included Ringo Starr's album "Ringo Rama," which features guest appearances from Eric Clapton and Pink Floyd's David Gilmour, the 30th anniversary Super Audo CD reissue of Pink Floyd's "Dark Side of the Moon," and Ted Nugent's DVD "Full Bluntal Nugity."

In 2004

  • The Who played the last of three club dates in London, which served as warm-up gigs before a performance as part of the Teenage Cancer Trust benefit concert series later in the month.
  • Patti LaBelle began her search for back-up vocalists  for an upcoming tour with the first of three days of auditions at the Indre Studios in Philadelphia.


In 2006

  • Patti LaBelle broke down in tears ten-minutes into her set at the Riviera Beach Jazz and Blues Festival in Florida, telling the crowd that her age and health just weren't mixing well with the late hour and cold weather and she wouldn't be able to perform.
  • Previews began for the Broadway production of the Elton John-Bernie Taupin musical "Lestat."


In 2007

  • Elton John turned 60, giving his record-setting 60th performance at New York's Madison Square Garden.  He was inducted into Madison Square Garden's Music Hall of Fame during the show with the raising of a banner reading "Most Performances by a Single Artist."


In 2008

  • Bon Jovi guitarist Richie Sambora was arrested in Laguna Beach, California, after police allegedly observed him driving his black Hummer erratically.  He was reportedly detained after failing numerous field sobriety tests.


In 2009

  • Smokey Robinson and Motown founder Berry Gordy were guests on "American Idol" for the show's "Motown Week."  Robinson had served as the guest mentor.


In 2012

  • Gregg Allman, who was battling a bulging disc, skipped the Allman Brothers Band's final night of the group's annual Beacon Theater concerts.   Blues Traveler's John Popper and Wet Willie's Jimmy Hall were among the guests who filled in for Allman.
  • Parliament-Funkadelic's Bootsy Collins revealed in a Facebook post that R&B great Bobby Womack was battling cancer.  Womack was later deemed cancer free after undergoing surgery.


In 2013

  • Charlie Daniels was admitted to a Nashville area hospital to have a pacemaker implanted in his chest.  Doctors discovered he had an irregular heartbeat while treating him for a mild case of pneumonia.


In 2014

  • Rolling Stones frontman Mick Jagger was among several people who spoke at the private funeral for his girifriend, L'Wren Scott, at the Hollywood Forever Funeral Home in Los Angeles.  Jagger's daughters Karis and Jade, his grandchildren, and Scott's brother also took part in the service.  L'Wren was found dead in her Manhattan apartment on March 17th after taking her own life.
  • New rock releases included the 40th anniversary edition of Elton John's classic album "Goodbye Yellow Brick Road."


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Today's Birthdays, March 24…
  • Supertramp bassist Dougie Thomson is 64.
  • War harmonica player and vocalist Lee Oskar is 67.
  • Nick Lowe is 66.
 

Today in History…

  • In 1958
  • Elvis Presley was sworn in as a private in the U.S. Army, reporting to a local draft board in Memphis, Tennessee.  He was then sent to basic training in Fort Hood, Texas and eventually shipped out to Germany, serving overseas in Company D, 32nd Tank Battalion, 3rd Armor Corps.
  • Connie Francis' "Who's Sorry Now" peaked at number four on the pop singles chart.

In 1959
  • The Drifters released the single "There Goes My Baby."  It was the group's first release with Ben E. King and without former frontman Clive McPhatter.

In 1962
  • Mick Jagger and Keith Richards performed on stage together for the first time, calling their group Little Boy Blue and the Blue Boys.
  • Sam Cooke's "Twistin' The Night Away" hit number one on the Billboard R&B chart and peaked at number nine on the pop singles chart.
  • Elvis Presley's "Good Luck Charm" broke into the Top 40.

In 1965
  • Rolling Stones bassist Bill Wyman was knocked unconscious from an electrical shock he got during a show in Denmark.

In 1971
  • The Carpenters released their self-titled album.

In 1972
  • Stevie Wonder released the album "Music of My Mind."

In 1973
  • Pink Floyd's album "The Dark Side Of The Moon" debuted on the Billboard album chart.  It stayed on the Billboard album chart for over 700 weeks.
  • Lou Reed was bitten on his behind by a concertgoer during a show in Buffalo, New York.  The male fan was kicked out of the show.
  • The O'Jays' "Love Train" hit number one on the pop singles chart.
  • War's "Cisco Kid" broke into the Top 40.

In 1974
  • The Doobie Brothers released the album "What Were Once Vices Are Now Habits," featuring the hit "Black Water."

In 1978
  • Wings released the single "With A Little Luck."

In 1979
  • The Bee Gees' "Tragedy" hit number one on the pop singles chart.

In 1980
  • The Beatles' album "Rarities" was released in the U.S.

In 1982
  • Iron Maiden released the album "The Number Of The Beast."

In 1984
  • Beach Boy Al Jardine got married to Mary Ann Helmandollar.
  • Christine McVie's "Got A Hold On Me" peaked at number ten on the pop singles chart.

In 1986
  • New album releases included The Rolling Stones' "Dirty Work" and the soundtrack to the movie "Absolute Beginners," featuring the work of Ray Davies and David Bowie.

In 1997
  • Harold Melvin, of Harold Melvin and the Blue Notes, died from complications from a stroke.  He was 58.

In 2002
  • Randy Newman's "If I Didn't Have You," from the movie "Monsters, Inc.," took the Oscar for Best Original Song.

In 2003
  • Ringo Starr made a guest appearance on the syndicated talk show "Live with Regis and Kelly."

In 2004
  • The Who played the second of three club dates in London, which served as warm-up gigs before a performance as part of the Teenage Cancer Trust benefit concert series later in the month.
  • Aretha Franklin was released from a Detroit-area hospital after a four-day stay for treatment for a blood disorder, which doctors said was caused either by a virus or an allergic reaction to an antibiotic.

In 2006
  • Neil Diamond was entered into the ESKY Hall of Fame in "Esquire" magazine's annual ESKY Awards.
  • Stoned," a biopic about the late Rolling Stones guitarist Brian Jones, opened in theaters in select markets.
  • Graham Nash and Loggins and Messina's Jim Messina performed at a benefit concert for the Algalita Marine Research Foundation and Watershed Expo 2006 in Hermosa Beach, California.

In 2008
  • Robert Plant and Alison Krauss' "Raising Sand" topped the Canadian folk magazine "Penguin Eggs'" list of the Critics' Albums of the Year for 2007.  Mavis Staples' "We'll Never Turn Back" and Levon Helm' "Dirt Farmer" also made the list.

In 2009
  • Phil Spector's attorney gave his closing argument in the legendary producer's second murder trial.
  • The Funk Brothers drummer Uriel Jones died at a Dearborn, Michigan hospital of complications following bypass surgery he had several weeks earlier.  He was 74.

In 2012
  • Severe back pain kept Gregg Allman from finishing the Allman Brothers Band's show at New York's Beacon Theater.  He left the concert 30 minutes before it ended.

In 2013
  • Stevie Nicks appeared on Oprah's "Master Class" and opened up about her battle with cocaine and alcohol addiction. 
  • Songwriter Deke Richards, whose credits included the Jackson 5's "I Want You Back" and "ABC," and the Diana Ross and the Supremes hit "Love Child," died of cancer in Bellingham, Washington.  He was 68.  Richards was part of Motown's famed songwriting and production team The Corporation, and also crafted hits for Bobby Darin, Bonnie Bramlett, Martha and the Vandellas, and others.

In 2014
  • The Allman Brothers postponed their final four dates of their last annual engagement at New York's Beacon Theater because Gregg Allman was sick.  The group played make-goods in the fall.

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Today's Birthdays, 3/23…
  • Former Cars frontman Ric Ocasek is 66.
  • Chaka Khan is 62.


Today in History…
In 1955

  • The movie "Blackboard Jungle" hit theaters.  The film featured the Bill Haley and the Comets song "Rock Around the Clock."


In 1960

  • Elvis Presley traveled by train from Nashville to Miami to tape a TV show with Frank Sinatra.  The show was to serve as Presley's welcome home from the Army.


In 1961

  • Elvis Presley recorded the song "Can't Help Falling In Love."  Meanwhile, his song "Wooden Heart" hit number one on the UK pop singles chart and stayed there for six weeks.


In 1963

  • Dion married Sue Butterfield.
  • The Beach Boys released the single "Surfin' U.S.A."


In 1964

  • The Beatles won three Ivor Novello Awards in London.
  • John Lennon's first book, "In His Own Write," was published.


In 1969
Anita Bryant and The Lettermen took part in a "Rally for Decency" in Miami following a concert by The Doors in which Jim Morrison is said to have exposed himself on stage.

In 1970

  • While The Beatles had scrapped the recording sessions for the album "Let It Be," manager Allen Klein brought Phil Spector in to produce the work.


In 1972

  • Pink Floyd played the first of eight shows at the Roman amphitheater in Pompeii, Italy.  The concerts were also recorded.


In 1973

  • John Lennon's wife Yoko Ono received permission to live in the U.S. permanently.
  • Derek and the Dominos' album "Derek and the Dominos in Concert" was certified Gold.


In 1975

  • Neil Young, Bob Dylan, Jefferson Starship, and Graham Central Station were among the artists who performed at a benefit concert in San Francisco for the local school system, which, because of budget cuts, had scrapped most of its athletics program and other after-school activities.


In 1979

  • Van Halen released the album "Van Halen 2."


In 1983

  • ZZ Top released the album "Eliminator."


In 1985

  • Billy Joel and model Christy Brinkley were married in a ceremony in New York.  The marriage lasted nine years.
  • Jeanine Deckers, better known as The Singing Nun, killed herself as part of a suicide pact.  She was 51.  The Singing Nun was best known for the 1963 hit "Dominique," which she recorded when she was a nun.  She had since left the convent.
  • Survivor's "High On You" peaked at number eight on the pop singles chart.


In 1988

  • Mick Jagger played his first solo concert in Japan.


In 1992

  • Bette Midler won 400-thousand-dollars in damages following a lawsuit in which she sued an ad agency that used a Midler sound-alike in a commercial.


In 1993

  • Aerosmith received the Boston Music Awards' "Right To Rock" award, recognizing the band's efforts to fight censorship.


In 1999

  • A set of postage stamps was issued in Gibraltar to commemorate what would have been John Lennon and Yoko Ono's 30th wedding anniversary.


In 2000

  • Tina Turner launched the North American leg of her farewell tour with a show in Minneapolis, Minnesota.


In 2002

  • ZZ Top bassist Dusty Hill married actress Charleen McCrory in a ceremony in Houston, Texas.


In 2003

  • Elton John hosted his 11th annual Oscar party, which raises money for the Elton John AIDS Foundation, at the Marquee Club in West Hollywood.


In 2004

  • Eric Clapton's album "Me and Mr. Johnson" was released exclusively on the Internet, and he made an appearance on NBC's "Today" show to promote the album.  The disc hit stores a week later.
  • Material from The Beatles, Bruce Springsteen, Chuck Berry, Otis Redding, Marvin Gaye, and Carole King was among the selections for inclusion in the National Recording Preservation Board's National Recording Registry.


In 2005

  • John Mellencamp and Donovan began a collaborative tour with a show in Savannah, Georgia.


In 2008

  • Beatles associate Neil Aspinall, who began his career with the band as their driver and became the head of the group's Apple Corps, died of lung cancer.  He was 66.
  • Former KC and the Sunshine Band bassist Richard Finch was arrested in Newark, New Jersey after a young boy alleged that the musician had initiated sexual contact with him.  Police said that after his arrest Finch admitted to other sexual acts with teenage boys.


In 2013

  • The exhibit "David Bowie Is" opened at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London.  It set an attendance record prior to opening, with more than 47-thousand advanced tickets sold.


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