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Today In Rock History, 9/17...
In 1967
The Doors performed on the "Ed Sullivan Show," playing "People Are Strange" and "Light My Fire."  Before the show, Sullivan asked Jim Morrison to either change or cut the line "Girl, we couldn't get much higher" from "Light My Fire."  Morrison didn't comply.

In 1979
Frank Zappa released the album "Joe's Garage."

In 1986
Georgia Satellites released their self-titled album.

In 1987
Kiss released the album "Crazy Nights."

In 1990
Poison released the single "Something To Believe In."

In 1991
Guns N' Roses released the albums "Use Your Illusion I" and "Use Your Illusion II" simultaneously at midnight.  Within two hours, record stores had sold a half million copies.

MC5's lead singer Rob Tyner died of a heart attack.  He was 46.

In 1997
Fleetwood Mac began a reunion tour prompted by the success of the album "The Dance."

In 2001
Yusef Islam, the artist formerly known as Cat Stevens, spoke out as a Muslim against the September 11th terrorist attacks on the U.S.

In 2003
U2's Bono met with President Bush to discuss the U.S. giving more money to AIDS initiatives.

In 2004
Aretha Franklin performed the first of two shows at the Greek Theater in Los Angeles.  The concerts were her first performances in Southern California in more than 20 years.

Lenny Kravitz, Velvet Revolver, The Strokes, Alice Cooper, James Brown, and The Doors of the 21st Century were among the artists who performed at the first of two "Rock Through Time" concerts, honoring the 50th anniversary of rock, at the Roseland Ballroom in New York.

In 2005
Paul Simon, Elvis Costello, and Bette Midler were among the artists who took part in the "Higher Ground Hurricane Relief Benefit Concert" in New York.

In 2006
Bon Jovi's Jon Bon Jovi was in the town of Houma, Louisiana to officially open Bon Jovi Boulevard.  While in the town, which is not far from New Orleans, the singer handed out keys to the first 28 homes on the block and visited with some of the families moving in.  The houses on Bon Jovi Boulevard were built using money the band had donated a year earlier to Oprah Winfrey's Angel Network for Hurricane Katrina relief.

In 2007
The registration deadline for tickets to Led Zeppelin's reunion show was extended by two days because the ticket application website had crashed in the first 24-hours of the concert's announcement.  On its first day up the site received more than five-million-hits an hour, and at one point the site was receiving 80-thousand requests per minute, which overloaded the system. 

In 2009
John Fogerty received the Lifetime Achievement Award at the Americana Music Association's 8th annual Honors and Awards ceremony in Nashville.

In 2013
New releases included Graham Nash's autobiography "Wild Tales: A Rock & Roll Life" and Linda Ronstadt's memoir "Simple Dreams," as well as Yoko Ono's album "Take Me To The Land Of Hell."

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Today's Birthdays, September 12th
Foghat bassist Tony Stevens is 65.
America guitarist Gerry Beckley is 62.
The Foundations' Colin Young is 70.
The Del-Vikings' Gus Backus is 77.
Maria Muldaur is 71.  She's best known for the 1973 hit "Midnight at the Oasis."


Today In History September 12th  
In 1948
A 13-years-old Elvis Presley moved with his parents from
Tupelo, Mississippi, to Memphis, Tennessee.
In 1959
Paul Anka and Bobby Rydell were guests on "Dick Clark's Saturday Night Show."

In 1963
The Beatles' "She Loves You" hit number one on the UK pop singles chart.

In 1964
The Dave Clark Five's "Because" peaked at number three on the pop singles chart.
Manfred Mann's "Do Wah Diddy Diddy" broke into the Top 40.

In 1965
The Beatles appeared on "The Ed Sullivan Show," performing "I Feel Fine," "I'm Down," "Act Naturally," "Ticket to Ride," "Help," and "Yesterday."

In 1970
Smokey Robinson and the Miracles' "Tears of a Clown" hit number one on the UK pop singles chart.
Mungo Jerry's "In the Summertime" peaked at number three on the pop singles chart.
Chicago's "25 or 6 to 4" peaked at number four on the pop singles chart.
The Kinks' "Lola" broke into the Top 40.
James Taylor released the single "Fire and Rain."
Bob Dylan, Joan Baez, and Arlo Guthrie were among the artists performing at the Woody Guthrie Memorial Concert at the Hollywood Bowl.

In 1978
Fleetwood Mac's "Little Lies" broke into the Top 40.

In 1981
Journey had the top selling album with "Escape," including the songs "Don't Stop Believin'" and "Who's Crying Now."

In 1990
Stevie Nicks and Christine McVie announced that they would no longer perform with Fleetwood Mac.

In 1992
Eric Clapton's "Unplugged" broke into the albums chart.

In 1999
Neil Young was among the performers at Farm Aid '99.

In 2000
The four-CD box set "The Jimi Hendrix Experience" was released.

In 2001
The BMI Awards in London were cancelled, quote, "out of respect for the events in the United States."  Pete Townshend was to have been honored at the ceremony, receiving the President's Award.

In 2002
Warren Zevon announced that he'd been diagnosed with terminal lung cancer.
Jeff Beck launched a three-night stand at London's Royal Festival Hall, performing career retrospective shows called "Jeff Beck: From the Yardbirds to the Future."  Pink Floyd's Roger Waters, Bad Company's Paul Rodgers, and Mahavishnu Orchestra's John McLaughlin were among the guest artists who joined Beck for the shows.

In 2003
The Beatles sued Apple computers over the technology company's iTunes store, claiming it infringed on the copyrights of group's logo of their Apple Corps label.
Country legend Johnny Cash died in Nashville.  He was 71.

In 2004
Session drummer Kenny Buttrey, who played on numerous albums including Bob Dylan's "All Along the Watchtower" and Jimmy Buffett's "Margaritaville," died at his home in Nashville following a battle with cancer.  He was 59.

In 2005
The Neville Brothers joined The Dave Matthews Band for the "A Benefit for Hurricane Relief" fundraising concert at Red Rocks in Morrison, Colorado.

In 2006
The Who launched its first North American tour in four years -- and the band's first trek in support of a new album since the early 1980s -- with a show in Philadelphia.
Bob Seger released the album "Face the Promise," his first collection of new studio material in more than a decade.
Orleans' John Hall won the primary to become the democratic candidate for New York's 19th district seat in the U.S. House of Representatives.  Two months later he also won the general election to take the seat.

In 2007
Led Zeppelin announced plans to play a reunion concert in London as part of a tribute show honoring the late Atlantic Records executive Ahmet Ertegun, marking the band's first full concert since drummer John Bonham's death in 1980.  The group featured frontman Robert Plant, guitarist Jimmy Page, and bassist-keyboardist John Paul Jones with Jason Bonham -- the son of the group's late drummer -- filling in for his dad.

In 2008
It was "Brian Wilson Day" in Los Angeles.  The former Beach Boy attended a council meeting to accept the formal proclamation, and called the declaration one of the biggest honors of his career.
Cheech & Chong launched their "Light Up America..." tour with a performance in Philadelphia.  The trek marked the comedy duo's first road trip together in more than 25 years.
Metallica released the album "Death Magnetic."

In 2011
Aretha Franklin received the Founder's Award from the Thelonious Monk Institute of Jazz at an event in Washington, DC.
 
In 2012
Bonnie Raitt, Booker T. Jones, and Richard Thompson recieved Lifetime Achievement Awards from the Americana Music Association at the 11th annual Americana Honors and Awards ceremony in Nashville.  The late Levon Helm was also remembered with an all-star tribute at the event.

In 2013
Barry White's Hollywood Walk of Fame star was unveiled.  Motown founder Berry Gordy and White's widow took part in the ceremony.
Village People cowboy Randy Jones and his partner Will Grega began a three-day wedding ceremony in New York City.  The two had been a couple for 30 years.
Ray Dolby, the inventor of the Dolby sound system, died at the age of 80.  He had been suffering from Alzheimer's disease and acute leukemia.

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Today's Birthdays, 9/11.
Grateful Dead drummer Mickey Hart is 71.
Styx's Tommy Shaw is 61.
Culture Club drummer Jon Moss is 57.
The Buckinghams guitarist DennisTufano is 68.
Guitarist Leo Kottke is 69.
The Monotones lead singer Charles Patrick is 76.


Today In History, 9/11
In 1962
The Beatles recorded "Love Me Do," "P.S. I Love You," and "Please Please Me" with Andy White playing drums.  Ringo provided the tambourine.
In 1963
The first rock bootleg, Bob Dylan's "Great White Wonder," appeared in a record store in
Los Angeles.
In 1965
Sonny & Cher's "Baby Don't Go" and The Fortunes' "You've Got Your Troubles" broke into the Top 40.
The Beatles' album "Help" hit number one on the charts.
Elvis Presley was featured in "The Saturday Evening Post."
In 1967
The Beatles began work on the film "Magical Mystery Tour."
The Fifth Dimension was a guest on the TV show "Hollywood Palace."
In 1968
The Beatles' "Hey Jude" hit number one on the UK pop singles chart.
In 1971
Donny Osmond's "Go Away Little Girl" hit number one on the pop singles chart.
Aretha Franklin's "Spanish Harlem" peaked at number two on the pop singles chart.
Rare Earth's "I Just Wanna Celebrate" peaked at number seven on the pop singles chart.
In 1976
Bob Dylan was on the cover of "TV Guide."
In 1977
David Bowie accepted Bing Crosby's invitation to appear on the legendary crooner's annual Christmas special.  The two performed the duet "Little Drummer Boy/Peace on Earth."
In 1979
The Who played its first gig without drummer Keith Moon, with former Faces drummer Kenny Jones taking his place.
Foreigner released the album "Head Games."
In 1983
John Cougar's album "American Fool" hit number one on the albums chart.
In 1984
Nearly 17-thousand people went to a Bruce Springsteen concert at the Spectrum in Philadelphia, setting a new attendance record for the stadium.
In 1987
Peter Gabriel won the Best Video Award for "Sledgehammer" at the MTV Video Music Awards.

In 1993
The album "Bob Dylan - The 30th Anniversary Concert Celebration" broke into the albums chart.  The disc features performances from Neil Young, John Mellencamp, and Tom Petty.
In 1995
AC/DC released the album "Ballbreaker."
In 1996
David Bowie released the single "Telling Lies" exclusively on the Internet.  It was the first time ever a major recording artist had done an Internet-only release.
In 2000
The Jimi Hendrix Surround Sound Theater and Exhibit opened at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum in Cleveland.
In 2001
Numerous artists, including Crosby, Stills, and Nash; Aerosmith; and John Mellencamp; cancelled concerts in the wake of the terrorist attacks on the U.S.
The Latin Grammy Awards ceremony was cancelled.  Santana was among the artists scheduled to perform at the event.  The show was never rescheduled, but winners were announced in a press conference several weeks later.
Bob Dylan released the album "Love and Theft."
In 2002
Al Green was among those who took part in the commemorative "Concert For America," which had been taped two days earlier and aired on this day.
A short film made by Yoko Ono to mark the first anniversary of the September 11th terrorist attacks aired on MTV.
In 2005
Smokey Robinson hosted the Smokey Robinson Celebrity Golf Classic at the Industry Hills Golf Course and Pacific Palms Resort in Los Angeles in support of the United Negro College Fund.
In 2008
Chubby Checker's "The Twist" was named The Billboard Hot 100 All-Time Top Song.
In 2011
Patti LaBelle was among the performers at "A Concert For Hope," which commemorated the 10th anniversary of the September 11th, 2001 terrorist attacks.
The Beach Boys joined the Colorado Symphony and the Colorado Children's Chorale for the special "Colorado Remembers 9/11" ceremony in Denver.
In 2012
New releases included Bob Dylan's "Tempest," ZZ Top's "La Futura," the Texas trio's first set of new studio material in nine years, and the documentary "Produced By George Martin," about the life and work of the famed Beatles producer.  


Today's Birthdays, 9/10
Aerosmith guitarist Joe Perry is 64.
Former Jethro Tull drummer Barriemore Barlow is 65.
Three Dog Night frontman Danny Hutton is 72.
Slade drummer Don Powell is 68.
Jose Feliciano is 69.
John Lennon's ex-wife Cynthia is 75.

Today In History
In 1955
Chuck Berry's "Maybelline" peaked at number five on the pop singles chart.
In 1956
Record stores were swamped with requests for Elvis Presley's "Love Me Tender," the title song from his movie.  The single hadn't been released yet.
In 1964
The Kinks' "You Really Got Me" hit number one on the
UK pop singles chart.
Rod Stewart recorded his first single, "Good Morning Little Schoolgirl."  Future Led Zeppelin bassist John Paul Jones played on the session.
In 1965
The Byrds recorded the song "Turn Turn Turn."
In 1966
The Beatles' album "Revolver" hit number one on the albums chart.
The Surpremes' "You Can't Hurry Love" hit number one on the pop singles chart.
Wilson Pickett's "Land of a Thousand Dances" peaked at number six on the pop singles chart.
Neil Diamond landed his first single in the Top 40 with "Cherry Cherry."  Other singles entering the Top 40 chart included Los Bravos' "Black is Black" and Jimmy Ruffin's "What Becomes of the Brokenhearted."
The Rolling Stones appeared on "The Ed Sullivan Show."
In 1973
The BBC banned the Rolling Stones' single "Star Star" because of its objectionable lyrics
In 1974
The New York Dolls broke up.
In 1975
Bob Dylan performed on a TV special honoring John Hammond.
New album releases included Pink Floyd's "Wish You Were Here" and Kiss' "Kiss Alive."
In 1977
James Taylor's "Handy Man" peaked at number four on the pop singles chart.
Linda Ronstadt released the single "Blue Bayou."
In 1980
The Rolling Stones' album "Emotional Rescue" was certified Gold and Platinum.  The band also released the single "She's So Cold" backed with "Send It To Me."
In 1983
Jackson Browne's "Lawyers in Love" peaked at number 13 on the pop singles chart.
AC/DC's "A Flick of the Switch" broke into the albums chart.
In 1988
Steve Winwood's "Don't you Know What The Night Can Do?" broke into the Top 40.
The first Elvis Presley credit card was issued.
In 1990
The Hard Rock Cafe opened in Las Vegas
In 1991
Dire Straits released the album "On Every Street."
In 1992
Creedence Clearwater Revival, Frankie Lymon and the Teenagers, Sly and the Family Stone, Van Morrison, The Doors, and Cream were among the inductees into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.
In 1996
John Mellencamp released the album "Mr. Happy Go Lucky."
In 1998
Mac Davis received a star on Hollywood's Walk of Fame.
In 2000
Kiss announced yet another extension to its farewell tour, with plans to tour in Japan and Australia.
In 2005
Paul McCartney, The Rolling Stones, Brian Wilson, Neil Young, the Neville Brothers, and John Mellencamp were among the wide variety of rock, pop, rap, and country stars who took part in the simultaneous multi-channel Hurricane Katrina fundraiser "ReAct Now: Music & Relief."  Money raised went to several charities, including the American Red Cross, the Salvation Army, and America's Second Harvest.
Elvis Presley Enterprises donated all the profits from the day's ticket admissions to Graceland in Memphis to the American Red Cross to help with the organization's hurricane relief efforts.
In 2007
The jury began deliberations in Phil Spector's first murder trial.
In 2008
Peter Gabriel received the 2008 Ambassador of Conscience Award from Art for Amnesty from Amnesty International at an event in London.
Brian Wilson was among the artists who performed benefits in the Stand Up For A Cure concert series to raise funds and awareness for lung cancer research at the MemorialSloan-KetteringCancerCenter in New York.
Officials in Peoria, Illinois renamed the street in front of WoodruffHigh School "Fogelberg Parkway" in honor of singer-songwriter Dan Fogelberg, who graduated from the school, and his dad, who was the school's band director for many years.
In 2009
Bill Haley and His Comets original bass player Marshall Lytle needed another operation in which doctors amputated his left leg just above the knee.  The limb was irreparably damaged after a blood clot blocked circulation to his foot.
In 2010
The Sex Pistols' perfume arrived in stores in the U.S.  The fragrance is described as a mix of lemon, black pepper, ambrette seed, aldehydes, leather, and heliotrope with a "patchouli note."
Stevie Wonder, U2's The Edge, and Eurythmics' Dave Stewart were among the stars taking part in the "Stand Up to Cancer" multi-network telethon.  Neil Diamond and Heart also participated in the event, which raised money for cancer research.
Jerry Lee Lewis played a special encore with the cast following a performance of the Broadway musical "Million Dollar Quartet."
In 2011
Paul McCartney's documentary "The Love We Make: The Concert For New York City," which was developed from behind-the-scenes footage from the 2001 all-star benefit, had its broadcast premiere on Showtime.
Tony Orlando performed at the Patriots Day Celebration in Phoenix, Arizona, which commemorated the 10th anniversary of the September 11th, 2001 terrorist attacks.
In 2012
Paul McCartney topped CelebrityNetWorth.com's list of "The 50 Richest Lead Singers in the World," with an estimated fortune of 800-million-dollars.  U2's Bono ranked second, and Jimmy Buffett took third place.  Elton John and Mick Jagger completed the top five.
In 2013
While in Mexico City for a show, Bon Jovi drummer Tico Torres underwent emergency surgery to have his appendix removed.  The concert was postponed.
Mark Knopfler's "Pioneering" was finally released in the U.S.  The album had been released nearly a year earlier elsewhere in the world, but a contract dispute with his label prevented him from issuing the disc in the U.S. ###
 
 
Today In History, Tuesday, September 9  
In 1954
Elvis Presley performed at the opening of Katz Drug Store in Memphis.  Johnny Cash was reportedly in the audience.
In 1956
Elvis Presley made his first appearance on "The Ed Sullivan Show," performing "Love Me Tender," "Hound Dog," "Don't Be Cruel," and "Ready Teddy."
In 1957
Paul Anka's "Diana" hit number one on the pop singles chart.
Jerry Lee Lewis' "Whole Lotta Shakin' Going On" peaked at number three on the pop singles chart.
In 1958
Chuck Berry recorded the single "Run Rudolph Run" at Chess studios in Chicago.
In 1965
The Rolling Stones' "Satisfaction" hit number one on the UK pop singles chart.
In 1966
John Lennon met Yoko Ono.
In 1967
The Supremes' "Reflections" peaked at number two on the pop singles chart.
Bobby Vee & the Strangers' "Come Back When You Grow Up" peaked at number three on the pop singles chart.
Aretha Franklin's "Baby I Love You" peaked at number four on the pop singles chart.
The Association's "Never My Love" broke into the Top 40.
Sam & Dave released the single "Soul Man."
In 1969
The Rolling Stones album "Through the Past, Darkly" was certified Gold.
In 1970
Elvis Presley began his first tour in nine years with a show in Phoenix, Arizona.
In 1971
John Lennon released the album "Imagine," and he and Yoko appeared on the "Dick Cavett Show."
In 1972
Gary Glitter's "Rock and Roll Part 2" peaked at number seven on the pop singles chart.
The Who's "Join Together" peaked at number 17 on the pop singles chart.
Elvis Presley's "Burnin' Love" broke into the Top 40.
The Eagles released the single "Witchy Woman."
Yes' album "Closer To The Edge" peaked at number three on the album chart.
In 1974
The Three Degrees released the single "When Will I See You Again."
In 1975
Wings began a 13-month world tour.
Linda Ronstadt released the album "Prisoner in Disguise."
In 1978
Frankie Valli made his debut solo TV appearance, performing "Grease" on "American Bandstand."
Foreigner's "Hot Blooded" peaked at number three on the pop singles chart.
The Rolling Stones released the single "Beast of Burden."
The Who's last album with Keith Moon, "Who Are You," broke into the albums chart.
U2 opened for the British punk band The Stranglers at the Top Hat Ballroom in Dublin, Ireland.
In 1979
Sid Bernstein offered the Beatles 500-million-dollars to reunite.
Cat Stevens, under his chosen name of Yusuf Islam, married Fouzia Ali at Kensington Mosque in London.
In 1982
Al Green and Patti LaBelle made their Broadway debut performing in a production of "You Arm's Too Short To Box With God."
In 1983
Linda Ronstadt released the album "What's New."
In 1986
David Lee Roth's album "Eat 'em and Smile" was certified Gold and Platinum.
In 1992
At the MTV Video Music Awards, Van Halen's video "Right Now" won the Best Video award and Eric Clapton's "Tears In Heaven" won the Best Male Video award.
In 1993
The Beatles albums "The Beatles 1962-1966," also known as "The Red Album" and "The Beatles 1967-1970," also known as "The Blue Album" were released on CD.
In 1996
John Lennon's hand-written lyrics to "Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds" sold for more than 48-thousand-dollars at an auction in San Francisco.
Tom Petty and Jane, his wife of 22 years, divorced
In 2000
Rush drummer Neil Peart remarried, exchanging vows with photographer Carrie Nuttall in a ceremony in Montecito, California.
In 2002
Gordon Lightfoot cancelled an appearance at the Stratford Music Festival in Stratford, Ontario, Canada because he was hospitalized with a stomach ailment.
Anne Murray was inducted into the Canadian Country Music Hall of Fame.
Aerosmith's Steven Tyler was among the mourners at the funeral for his ex-wife, Cyrinda Foxe-Tyler.  Foxe-Tyler died of brain cancer.  She was 51.
In 2003
Simon and Garfunkel teamed up at the Bottom Line in New York to announce plans for their "Old Friends" tour, which marked their first trek together in nearly ten years.
Former Aerosmith manager David Krebs sued the group over statements the band made on VH1's "Behind the Music," in which they accused him of stealing.
In 2004
An exhibit on the life of Jimi Hendrix, said to be the most extensive collection of memorabilia on the late guitar legend, opened at the Marquee Club in London.
Elton John was among the artists who took part in the NFL's "Opening Night Kickoff" TV special ushering in the new football season.
In 2005
Randy Newman, Paul Simon, Neil Young, and Rod Stewart participated in the network TV telethon "Shelter from the Storm: A Concert for the Gulf Coast."  The event aired simultaneously on ABC, CBS, FOX, NBC, and a number of other networks.
Stevie Wonder was among the participants in the "S.O.S. (Saving Our Selves) The BET Relief Telethon."  He was also the honoree during the two-day taping of the United Negro College Fund's "An Evening of Stars" benefit show in Los Angeles.
Judy Collins received the Spirit of Americana Free Speech Award from the Americana Music Association in conjunction with the First Amendment Center at an awards ceremony in Nashville.
The three-day conference "Glory Days: A Bruce Springsteen Symposium," in which academics analyzed and critiqued the work of Springsteen, began at Monmouth University in New Jersey.
In 2007
John Mellencamp, Neil Young, Allman Brothers Band, Warren Haynes, The Derek Trucks Band, Dave Matthews, and Counting Crows were among the performers at Farm Aid 2008: A Homegrown Festival at Randall's Island in New York.
The Outlaws frontman Hughie Thomasson died.  He reportedly went out to dinner, and after returning home fell asleep in his favorite chair, and is believed to have suffered a fatal heart attack.  Thomasson was 55.
In 2008
Eric Carmen was arrested in Orange Village, Ohio and charged with DUI.  It was the former Raspberries frontman's second DUI arrest in 18-months.
Dionne Warwick, Bonnie Raitt, and Jerry Butler were the hosts of the Rhythm and Blues Foundation's 20th Anniversary Pioneer Awards Gala, which took place in Philadelphia.  Kool & the Gang, The Whispers, Chaka Khan, Bill Withers, Teena Marie, the Funk Brothers, Stax Records' Al Bell, and the late Donny Hathaway were among the honorees, while Booker T and the MGs' Steve Cropper, Gary "U.S." Bonds, and Hall & Oates' John Oates were some of the participants in the ceremony.
In 2009
"The Beatles: Rock Band" video game arrived in stores, along with remastered individual copies of the band's albums and mono and stereo boxed sets.
Jimmy Buffett and Grateful Dead drummer Mickey Hart took part in a public memorial service for the late television journalist Walter Cronkite at New York's Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts.
In 2010
John Mellencamp received the 2010 Lifetime Achievement for Songwriting at the 9th Annual Americana Honors and Awards ceremony in Nashville.
In 2011
U2's Bono and The Edge took part in an online chat in conjunction with the premiere of the band's film "From The Sky Down" at the Toronto International Film Festival.
It was "Otis Redding Day" in  Bibb County, Georiga and the city of Macon, which also hosted a series of event commemorating what would have been the singer's 70th birthday.
Tony Orlando headlined the "Tie A Yellow Ribbon Reception" fundraiser in Scottsdale, Arizona.  The event commemorated the 10th anniversary of the September 11th, 2011 terrorist attacks, and featured tributes to the families of soldiers killed in Iraq as well as to two World War Two vets.
In 2013
Neil Young spoke at the National Farmers Union rally in Washington, DC.  The rocker addressed a number of related topics in his ten-minute speech, including the family farmer and biofuel.
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Today's Birthdays, Tuesday, September 9. 
The Eurythmics Dave Stewart is 62.
Paul Revere & the Raiders guitarist Freddy Weller is 67.
Main Ingredient singer Luther Simmons Jr. is 72.
Dee Dee Sharp is 69.  She's best known for the hit "Mashed Potato Time."
Former Iron Butterfly frontman Doug Ingle is 69.
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Today's Birthdays, Monday, September 8
The English Beat bassist David "Shuffle" Steele is 54.
Keyboardist Dean Daughtry is 68.  He's worked with the groups Classics IV and Atlanta Rhythm Section.
Former Bad Religion drummer Jay Ziskrout is 52.
Today In History
In 1956
Eddie Cochran signed a contract with Liberty Records.
In 1958
Paul Anka began his first tour of Southeast Asia.
In 1965
"Variety" magazine ran an ad announcing auditions for "The Monkees" TV show.
In 1968
The Beatles performed "Hey Jude" on the British ITV show "Frost on Sunday."
In 1971
Elvis Presley received the Bing Crosby Award in recognition of his significant contribution to the record industry.
In 1972
Neil Young's family grew with the birth of his son, Zeke.
Dr. John, Muddy Waters, and Howlin' Wolf were among the performers at the Ann Arbor Jazz & Blues Festival in Michigan.
In 1973
Marvin Gaye's "Let's Get It On" hit number one on the pop singles chart.
The Allman Brothers Band's "Brothers and Sisters" hit number one on the album chart.
In 1974
Bob Dylan and the Band released the album "Before The Flood."
In 1976
Peter Frampton visited the White House.  President Ford and his son Stephen extended the invitation to the British rocker.
Heart's debut album "Dreamboat Annie," featuring the hits "Crazy On You" and "Magic Man," was certified Gold.
In 1977
Wings guitarist Jimmy McCulloch quit the group.
In 1982
Peter Gabriel released the album "Security."
Cher began work on the film "Silkwood."
In 1984
Stevie Wonder's "I Just Called To Say I Love You" hit number one on the UK pop singles chart.
In 1988
Elton John sold numerous costumes and props -- including the "Pinball Wizard" boots he wore in the movie "Tommy" -- which brought in six-point-two-million-dollars at an auction in London.
In 1990
Bon Jovi hit number one on the pop singles chart with "Blaze Of Glory."
In 1994
John Mellencamp released the album "Dance Naked."
In 1997
Led Zeppelin released its first single in the UK.  "Whole Lotta Love" was issued to help promote the rerelease of the classic rock band's back catalog.
Former Beatles publicist Derek Taylor died.  He was 67.
In 2001
A tribute to Jimi Hendrix was part of the Street Scene festival in San Diego, featuring a performance by former Band of Gypsies Billy Cox and drummer Buddy Miles along with Pearl Jam guitarist Mike McCready, rock-rapper Kid Rock, Living Colour, and Los Lobos members Cesar Rojas and David Hidalgo.
In 2002
Gordon Lightfoot had emergency surgery for a stomach ailment at a hospital in suburban Toronto.
Iron Maiden frontman Bruce Dickinson took a job as a pilot, serving as a first officer for the England-based Astraeus airlines, earning a salary of just under 55-thousand-600-dollars.  The airline regularly flies to Portugal and Egypt.
The Rolling Stones played the first club gig of their "Licks" tour, taking the stage at the 28-hundred seat Orpheum Theater in Boston.
In 2003
David Bowie staged the "world's first live and interactive music event," performing in London in a show that was beamed by satellite to movie theaters across Europe.  Participants were able to request songs and ask Bowie questions during the show.  The event was in promotion of the album "Reality."
Bruce Springsteen paid tribute to the late Warren Zevon by performing "My Ride's Here" during a concert in Toronto.
In 2004
David Bowie and former Faces band mates Rod Stewart and Ron Wood were among the artists who participated in the "Fashion Rocks" concert as part of the official start of Fashion Week in New York.  The annual event, at Radio City Music Hall, celebrates how rock music influences pop culture and style.
The Queen-influenced musical "We Will Rock You" officially opened at the Paris Las Vegas in Nevada, starting a planned ten-year run at the venue.
Ray Charles' CD "Genius Loves Company," the last album he completed in his lifetime, debuted on the Billboard 200 album chart at number two, behind country singer Tim McGraw's "Live Like You Were Dying."
The British documentary "John Lennon's Jukebox," about a portable jukebox once owned by the late Beatle, made its US TV debut as part of PBS' "Great Performances" series.  The Lovin' Spoonful's John Sebastian, Donovan, Delbert McClinton, and Fontella Bass were among the artists who contributed to the documentary.
In 2005
The Rolling Stones announced that the group had made a one-million-dollar donation to the American Red Cross Disaster Relief Fund for Hurricane Katrina.  In addition, the band began collection donations for the Red Cross at concerts, starting with this night's show in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.
The Rolling Stones and Santana were among the artists who took part in the TV special "NFL Opening Kickoff," which launched the 2005-2006 football season.
David Bowie took part in the 2005 Fashion Rocks concert at New York's Radio City Music Hall.
Aretha Franklin earned the Lena Horne Award at the 2005 Lady of Soul Awards.
The Fidelity Investments ad "This Is Paul," featuring Paul McCartney, began its TV run.
In 2007
U2's Bono was among the thousands of mourners who attended the funeral for legendary tenor Luciano Pavarotti in Modena, Italy.  The 71-year-old opera star died two days earlier of pancreatic cancer.
Lynyrd Skynyrd was inducted into the Georgia Music Hall of Fame.
In 2009
James Taylor was among the stars who took part in a performance along Chicago's Michigan Avenue to launch the 24th season of the syndicated "Oprah Winfrey Show."  The program aired two days later.
In 2011
U2 was on hand for the premiere of "From The Sky Down," the documentary about the making of the band's 1991 album "Achtung Baby," at the Toronto International Film Festival.
In 2012
Paul McCartney received the Legion of Honour award from French President Francios Hollande in a ceremony in Paris.
 
Today's Birthdays, Tuesday, September 9  
The Eurythmics Dave Stewart is 62.
Paul Revere & the Raiders guitarist Freddy Weller is 67.
Main Ingredient singer Luther Simmons Jr. is 72.
Dee Dee Sharp is 69.  She's best known for the hit "Mashed Potato Time."
Former Iron Butterfly frontman Doug Ingle is 69.  
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